Theo Kalomirakis Tag

Video: Exclusive–Inside Theo’s Dream Theater

A few months ago, we talked to Theo Kalomirakis about the theaters he was creating for his new home in Greece, including an outdoor venue that was a work in progress at the time. Aside from a couple of small touches, the latter space is now finished and in frequent use. Meant to evoke not just the open-air theaters that are common in Greece but his very first home theater, which he built on the balcony of his parents’ apartment in Athens when he was a teenager, the outdoor theater has a special importance for Theo. He’s even given it the same name as that first effort: Cine Katinaki.

 

Most people doing an outdoor theater would just buy a cheap projector and throw up a portable screen, but Theo has lavished the same level of attention on this space that he devoted to his indoor theater and that he invests in his private commissions. Cine Katinaki displays the signature design flair and carefully wrought details found in the more lavish works that established his reputation while retaining an unassuming simplicity that reflects its childhood origins.

An Epson 5050UB 4K projector supplies the image for a 12-foot custom-made steel-construction screen, with sound provided by a 5.1 Klipsch outdoor speaker system powered by an NAD T 758 receiver. The main source component is a Zappiti Mini 4K HDR movie player, which pulls movies from a Zappiti server in the indoor theater. Other content sources include a Roku Ultra, an Apple TV, and a Kaleidescape player with DVD drive.

 

Since we shot our video tour, Theo has installed accent lights to illuminate the retro ads to either side of the screen, 

pretty much bringing the theater to completion. And even though there are plenty of beautiful outdoor theaters for cinephiles to choose from in Athens—Cine Paris, for instance, features a dramatic view of the Acropolis—Theo’s Cine Katinaki has quickly become a much sought after movie-viewing destination.

Michael Gaughn

Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

Working with the Best, Pt. 4: Maria Deschamps

Working with the Best, Pt. 4: Maria Deschamps

For the fourth installment in our series on the premier artisans of luxury home entertainment, we talked to Canadian home theater designer Maria Deschamps. While Theo Kalomirakis has become synonymous with luxury theaters, there are other designers who almost exclusively cater to that segment of the market. And while Maria does also do commercial and residential work, she freely admits that home theaters are where her passion lies.

 

While many designers base their theaters on the iconic palaces from the golden age of moviegoing or lean on a more restrained, agnostic approach, Maria tends to go for playful designs with a distinctly modern flair. We talked to her about her transition from retail design to home theater, her unusual, gutsy strategy for breaking into the field, and how she gets a bead on what her clients are looking for so she can provide them with a unique home entertainment space.

—M.G.

(The text below is a slightly abridged version of the podcast,
which you can listen to using the player at the top of the page.)

It’s rare to come across a designer who just focuses on home theaters. What path led you to that?

It was a long path for me. When a designer finishes their education, we have to choose between commercial and residential design, and I chose commercial. I really loved the development that’s part of commercial design, and I loved all the big spaces and all the intricate details. But, after designing several hundred retail spaces all over the world, my work became really embedded in me; it took over my life. It was difficult for a woman with a family. So I started considering changing careers, but I didn’t want to lose all the knowledge and experience I had acquired. 

 

And that’s when I designed and built my own home theater—you know, a typical theater, no windows, the perfect size, and I think we had a 110-inch screen and three rows of seating. We designed the space so the ceiling was high enough so we had no ducts or obstructions to deal with. I loved that theater. I spent every free moment I had in it. It was my “escape from reality” room. 

 

Then one day, it just hit me. I realized I could pivot my career and go from being a commercial designer to being a custom home theater designer. But I knew I had to learn more, and also knew I needed allies. I went to a local trade show in Montreal and just introduced myself as a home theater designer, even though I had never designed home theaters before. 

Then an editor convinced me to advertise in his magazine, and he introduced me to a high-end audio/video store here.

 

So I designed a prototype, which was inspired by some photos I saw in another magazine I picked up at the show. And it was a theater designed by the one and only Theo Kalomirakis. I then met with the owners of the store and presented the design. I was honest with them and told them I had never done a home theater before except for my own, and I would offer my services to one of their clients free of charge, but only for the first stage of the design, the concept. If the client liked the concept, I’d work with them on the next phase and only bill for that phase.

 

They found me the perfect client, who was willing to accept this. Believe me, I put my heart into that project—blood, sweat, and tears—everything I could do. The client was super delighted and the integrator was really impressed. And of course I was very fulfilled. And, even though it was the first home theater I designed, it was published in the magazine and featured on the cover. So it was really, really amazing. That trade show was extremely beneficial and rewarding. I met the right people. I discovered Theo Kalomirakis and his career. So now I had like a new idol to follow, right? That’s how my path led to me specializing is this. It’s passion. I just love it.

 

Why are you so strongly drawn toward home theater?

I just found that I had a love for the total experience, being able to close that door and immerse yourself. You don’t have to go out. You can go in your PJs with a glass of wine and a bowl of popcorn or whatever. And I wanted to share that.

 

What influence has your commercial experience had on your home theater design?

I was designing for medium- to high-end retail. We designed everything from handrails to hang clothing on to shelves and brackets and displays. We designed custom

lighting. We really went all the way. With that background, I felt like I had the knowledge and the skills, and the resources. With all due respect to residential designers, I don’t think I would have had the success at the beginning if I didn’t have that background. I would have had to develop it a lot over time.

 

What do you think you bring to creating a home theater that a typical residential designer doesn’t?

Experience, of course, because I’ve been doing it for quite a while. Passion—you have to be passionate about your work. You have to want it. It’s been over 20 years since I designed my first theater, and I have learned a lot along the way. And luckily I’ve had the opportunity to work with high-end audio/video integrators and acoustic specialists and engineers. That taught me a lot, and I was willing to learn. I was there wide-eyed and bushy tailed, like, “Teach me! Teach me!”

 

You have to wear many hats. You have to be conscious of many different materials and finishes. You have to address building-code compliances, accessibilities, handicap needs. And you have to be able to properly lay out a space. You have to 

draft proposals and present design concepts to the clients.

 

Then you have to follow through with the execution. Even though you’re not building it yourself, you have to be there every step of the way. You can’t just do the plans and then hand them off and say, “You build it—goodbye.”

 

You have to have all of the skills of an interior designer plus the technical attributes that are specific to theater design. You have to be able to integrate the equipment in the space—that’s the most important thing. You can’t place speakers anywhere. 

Working with the Best, Pt. 4: Maria Deschamps

An example of Maria’s commercial design work, this lighting showroom featured LEDs when they were first being introduced to the market

You need to determine the sweet spot for everyone in the room, and you have to make sure the screen is installed at the right height. And obviously the seating has to be situated appropriately. Then there’s the whole “What kind of materials do we use?” which is extremely important. You can’t use hard surfaces like ceramic and glass, and you have to stay away from marbles and granites. Then you have to add soft absorptive materials, but not too much, because you don’t want the sound to be too flat or dull.

 

And don’t forget about the lighting. I love, love, love lighting. And I really love indirect lighting. Lighting is technical. You have to consider the light output, the wattage; but also the photometrics of the light and the kelvin temperature and the color-rendering index. The beam spread—what light do you put at 10 feet, and there’s a different beam spread you would use at seven feet. Typical designers just aren’t aware of all that. You don’t learn this in school. It’s experience and asking questions.

 

So there’s a lot to consider. Basically, a home theater designer will bring all the experience a typical designer has and then have the ability to integrate with the appropriate equipment and speakers. And you have to be able to work parallel with the integrator because they’re the ones who’ll propose the equipment, so you have to follow their lead. At the same time, you have to please the clients and follow their vision, and maximize their entertainment experience.

 

How do people find out about you? Is it mainly by word of mouth? And if it is, who is passing those referrals along?

I have to admit, I never really keep track of how my clients come to me. And luckily, knock on wood, I’ve always been busy. Although business sometimes has its highs and lows, I’ve never had a dry period. That being said, I do realize that I get a lot 

Working with the Best, Pt. 4: Maria Deschamps

of referrals from clients and integrators. I’ve worked with previous clients more than once, and it’s really amazing when they call me back. It’s the ultimate compliment when they refer me to their best friend or their friends or sister-in-law or brother-in-law or whoever—which has happened like four times in just the past few months.

 

Besides referrals, I receive the majority of my clients through my website—like people searching for

“home theater designer”—and through social media. I would say the best social-media platforms are LinkedIn and then Houzz, which is pretty good for residential design. Social media in general is really great for branding. You have to be out there.

 

Walk me through how it goes for you when you when you’re working with a client for the first time. Is there a typical meeting or does it tend to be very much driven by that individual and their needs?

It’s a little of both. On one hand, I like to go with the flow—especially during a first meeting. You’ve got to get a feel for the client. But on the other hand, we really have to establish the process. 

 

There’s always a first telephone call before the first meeting. During the call, I have the opportunity to explain the process and talk about my fee, and I’ll set the tone for our meeting. I’ll tell the client I’m going to come and measure the space, present my portfolio, and review my services with them, and then I’ll go over the mandate. 

 

One of the most important things for me to do in the first meeting is listen and observe. It’s really, really important to understand what the client’s expectations are. I almost have to be the client and know what they like and what they want. At the same time, I have to utilize my experience and share my expertise. 

 

Often when I meet a client, it’s the first time this person or this family has ever had a home theater. So they really need someone to help them through it. They’re going to ask a lot of questions, and I have to take the time to answer them. Sometimes they expect me to have all the answers right away, but it’s not always possible to give specific solutions in a first meeting. You really have to sit down and prepare space-planning studies and determine what works best in a specific space, because every room is different. When we’re designing a home theater, it’s kind of like putting together a puzzle. You have to 

make sure you’ve included all the pieces and you’ve put them in the right spot.

 

How aware are clients of what their options are? Do you usually have to do a lot of educating early on?

I’d say maybe half of my clients are aware of the options and half are not. If the client is referred to me by an integrator, they’re usually pretty aware of the options because the integrator has already started the process. It

Working with the Best, Pt. 4: Maria Deschamps

often happens that they’ve already selected their equipment and their screen before they even meet me, so they’ve got a really good head start. When that’s the case, I often enhance what the integrator recommends, so I’ll usually add things like lighting systems to their plan—which sometimes they don’t even think about—or motorized drapes. Sometimes, I’ll suggest an extra subwoofer or a bigger screen.

 

Whether you’re a designer or an integrator, you have to let the clients know what is available. Show them the best of the best, and let them choose. I never assume the client can’t afford anything—unless they give me a set budget. I don’t base solutions or proposals on price. It’s really up to the client. 

 

Many people don’t think they have the space for a dedicated theater, but I think they just don’t have the ability to see the opportunities. Some people just can’t visualize. When you have a new home, it’s different because you plan for it in advance, but if you have an existing home and you want to put in a theater, and they’ve finished all the rooms, they kind of see the home for what it is, not for what it could be. It’s hard for them to see how they could renovate it. And this is where my space-planning skills really help. We take the existing plan and move around a few walls or add a few walls to make it happen.

 

I know that when Theo designs a theater room, he doesn’t feel an obligation to take the rest of the decor of the home into account. What is your approach to that? Is there a conversation early on about whether this is going to follow the style of the rest of the home, or do you make a case for this being a world onto itself?

There definitely is that conversation, and that’s why I think it’s really important to meet with the client in the home to see what they have. I always ask them, “Do you want to carry the design of your home into the home theater?” And I cross my fingers and hope they say no because I have always felt a theater is an escape, not only from the rest of the home but from your life and your work and the stress. So I like to be able to create something new and totally different that’s not like the rest of the 

Working with the Best, Pt. 4: Maria Deschamps

home. And, nine times out of ten, it is different—like they’ll put a color in the home theater they won’t use in the rest of the home. I have this famous purple home theater I designed [shown above] that everybody loves. But you wouldn’t put that much purple in the rest of your home. It’s a special space and it should be treated that way.

 

Coming out of the ’08 recession, a lot of designers were convinced home theater had had its day and the market was gravitating toward media rooms. But when the pandemic started, we saw a reversal take place, because people suddenly appreciated having someplace to escape to. Now the commissions are back and there’s a new appreciation for home theater. What has been your experience over the past 10 to 15 months?

O my—yes, yes, yes. The pandemic has really revitalized the home theater market. Private, dedicated home theaters are back. Seriously, can you blame us? We were forced to stay home, and be saturated with these news programs and social distancing. So what better way to escape that mass information than to immerse ourselves in watching movies or binging on TV series? For me, there’s no better way to do it than in a dedicated room where you can just close the door and really, really just get away. I have designed twice as many home theaters in this past year—at least twice as many. And they keep coming.

 

Do you think it’s going to last? Do you think we’re into another golden age here?

I do—I really do. And I really hope it does. Home theater has evolved, and a lot of people don’t necessarily want the standard theater seats. We’re changing the look a little. It’s not as palace-y as it used to be. The designs are still very luxurious, but they’re more lounge-y—more relaxed, more modern. We’re going to see bars coming back into home theaters and much more casual types of seating. But for me the upturn in business didn’t start right away. It took several months. But now, seriously—wow, wow, wow. People are really spending money on their homes. And they want it to be spectacular. And they want it now.

 

Is there anything else important you wanted to cover that I didn’t ask about?

I love educating people on designers and how designers can help them. One thing, though, that’s very important to mention is that what’s important for a successful design is to get started, first of all, way ahead of time and plan for it in advance, especially if you’re building a new home. Like, we really need to have the high ceilings.

 

A lot of designers talk about how, to this day, entertainment spaces tend to be treated as an afterthought.

Exactly. I had a recent client who has had his home under renovation for two years. They knew they wanted a home theater and they kind of had a space for it, but when I came into the equation, it was already too late to make changes. And it was rush, rush, rush—like, “We need it now, and we can’t make any changes”—so there was no flexibility, and it was really disappointing. Although the theater turned out beautiful—don’t get me wrong—it could have been so much better. So that’s really important. Get us involved early on and let’s plan for it properly.

Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

PODCAST EP. 22
QUICK GUIDE

 

  0:35  Maria’s early experiences with commercial

           design

  1:28  The transition to home theater design

  2:28  Designing her own home theater

  3:25  Launching her home theater design career

  4:41  Designing her first theater for a client

  7:24  Why she’s drawn toward home theater

           design

  8:05  The influence of her commercial design

           work on her theaters

  9:57  What she brings to a theater design that a

           typical interior designer doesn’t

15:05  Why she’s more comfortable with

           technology than most designers

16:48  How clients find out about her

18:54  The first meeting with a new client

21:21  Clients’ awareness of their technology

           options

23:10  People who don’t think they have the room

           for a theater when they actually do

24:43  Whether a theater should have the same

           look as the rest of the home

26:09  The importance of direct interaction with the

           client

27:49  Is home theater entering a second golden

           age?

29:08  The evolving styles of home theater

30:44  The importance of planning for a theater

           early in the designing of a home

REVIEWS

Stillwater (2021)
Super 8 (2011)
Jungle Cruise (2021)
The Killing (1956)
Ran (1985)
Broadway Danny Rose (1984)

ALSO ON CINELUXE

The Arguments Against Streaming Just Don’t Cut It Anymore
Movies to Deny Reality By
The Last Blu-ray Disc
The Cineluxe Hour

Home Theater’s Second Golden Age

Home Theater's Second Golden Age

There might be nothing to anything I have to say here. It’s all based on anecdote and speculation. The data might not ultimately bear me out. But, based on what I’ve heard from some of the top designers, it would seem that home theaters—or home cinemas or private cinemas or private theaters or whatever you want to call them—are going through something that could very well be considered a renaissance. 

 

Since this is more a rumination than a report, and since nobody has a better view of this particular part of the home-entertainment world than Theo Kalomirakis, I’m going to use his experiences of the past few years as my leaping-off point, and as representative of what I’ve been hearing from other, similar corners.

 

As the ’08 Recession took hold, Theo saw requests for luxury theaters decline dramatically, a trend that persisted for the next few years before settling into a kind of steady state. It was such a tremendous change from home theater’s Golden Age in 

the ‘90s that he began to wonder if dedicated theater rooms were going to fall completely out of favor, to be replaced by multi-use interlopers like media rooms and great rooms.

 

Then came the pandemic, which bore curveballs for pretty much every aspect of society, of course, but held some huge surprises in reserve for luxury home entertainment. As the enormity of the crisis sank in and it became clear things would stay dire for the foreseeable future, most people assumed we would all be hunkered down for the duration, personally, socially, economically, and culturally. But a few months in, I started hearing the same refrain from top-tier designers and integrators: Business was booming.

 

Forced to focus on a single residence, unable to enjoy entertainment anywhere but at home, and with some unexpected time available to contemplate their domestic priorities, many of their affluent clients were suddenly feeling the need for a movie-watching space that was not only completely up to date but also provided a refuge from both the increased activity in the rest of the home and from the outside world. A media room or great room, no matter 

how lavish, just wasn’t going to cut it. The desire for versatility had been trumped by the need for both escape and focus. An open-plan room meant to serve a variety of masters just can’t address those fundamental needs, no matter how well designed and constructed.

 

Based on the number of commissions the best of the best have been receiving recently, the evidence is mounting that home theaters are entering some kind of second golden age. But these new rooms aren’t just retreads of their movie-palace forebears but tend to embrace a more contemporary aesthetic, are much higher performance, and tend to be more accommodating to uses beyond movie-watching but without in any way compromising that defining experience.

 

As encouraging as all this is, my guess—and it’s just a guess—is that this phenomena will continue to play out almost exclusively at the very top of the market. Better and bigger (and cheaper) video displays and far better soundbars and streaming sources have made it easier for most people to settle for good enough in spaces that would need some serious work before they could even begin to approach great. For the broader market, where expediency rules, media rooms tend to make more sense. And, to be honest, the experience most of these people are having just isn’t that bad compared to what they were getting for the same money just five to seven years ago.

 

Maybe there isn’t a new golden age emerging. Maybe this is just a blip, an anomaly that ultimately signifies nothing. But it doesn’t feel that way; it feels like the core idea of a dedicated theater room still has legs and has returned to run another day by deriving strength from some completely unexpected places. If that’s true, it’s cause for celebration because it’s a chance to reinforce the singular importance of movies at a time when they’re in very real danger of becoming just another form of entertainment.

Michael Gaughn

Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas

Mention acoustics, and most people think of concert halls. Some, but not a lot, might also think of home theaters and listening rooms. The number of people who realize the importance for proper acoustics in domestic spaces beyond entertainment rooms is so small it barely exists.

 

But the number who are aware of noise, both inside and outside the home, is of course huge. Most people would love to tame those disturbances if they could, but don’t realize they can. That’s where Steve Haas comes in.

 

Top designers, architects, builders, and integrators, and wealthy individuals turn to his company SH Acoustics to make both performance and everyday spaces sound great and keep irritating noises at bay. Steve’s work includes well-known museums, concert halls, and other commercial spaces around the world, and he has designed the acoustics for some of Theo Kalomirakis’s most famous private theaters.

 

In the interview that follows, Steve discusses how he brought his early experiences in the commercial world to bear on his work in luxury residential environments, how high-end home-entertainment spaces have expanded beyond private theaters to live performance and jamming, and the importance of proper acoustics and noise mitigation throughout the home. 

—M.G.

(The text below is an abridged version of the podcast,
which you can hear using the player above.)

Would you consider your official title “acoustic designer”?

Depends on what day of the week it is. “Acoustic designer,” “acoustical consultant,” “acoustician”—it’s interchangeable.

 

While you began your residential career working on home theaters and other entertainment spaces, you actually operate under a much broader umbrella, right?

That is true. We’re brought into so many different types of spaces, inside and outside the home, that home theaters are obviously very important for us but we don’t just focus on them exclusively by any means.

 

Talk a little about how you evolved beyond those traditional entertainment spaces.

Well, it goes a little farther back than my residential experience because for 14 years I was part of an organization that did major commercial spaces—everything from concert halls to opera houses to Broadway theaters to houses of worship. Museums, especially. 

 

I fell into the world of residential by accident. A contractor simply called my office and said they were putting a home theater for I think it was the producer of Barbara Walters in an old historic barn—in the town I now live in, in Weston, Connecticut, ironically. So I just took it on on my own, in the outside hours, and found all these interesting challenges in the world of residential that I had no idea about. 

 

Even with everything I was doing in the commercial world, I quickly saw that dealing with this type of construction, and especially these types of clients—homeowners who wanted to spend a lot of time in this particular type of environment, an entertainment space, a home theater—very different from dealing with a symphony orchestra or the leaders of a big church or a museum director. I had to quickly decide if this was something that interested me and then realize what I had to do to change my mentality coming into this world if I wanted to continue with it, which I did.

 

It wasn’t long before homeowners started asking me, “OK, what can you do in my bedroom to quiet noise?” or “I have a lot of street noise coming into my house even though I live in a suburban environment. There are landscape trucks running up and down at 7 a.m. I don’t want to hear all that.” So, utilizing the skills and experiences I had in all these commercial environments, I realized there’s a lot more to addressing sound quality, sound control, than just in the home theaters.

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas
How much of this was a natural evolution from your commercial work?

To name-drop a bit, I had over-the-top experiences working on Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall [shown above] and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s new facility, where we had to isolate entire buildings on giant rubber blocks to keep subway vibrations from going up into the major performance spaces. That’s a tall task that we conquered, but it shows that bringing this type of experience to very challenging residential environments was a natural course of evolution beyond just thinking about the sound of a home theater or a media room inside the space. We were able to take those broad experiences in the commercial world with isolation or HVAC or electrical or plumbing noise and bring them to the level they needed to be in home environments.

 

The infrastructure in homes is evolving more in the direction of commercial spaces, with the increased sophistication of technology and with more people working from home, so I would imagine that’s another opportunity to tap into your early career.

It absolutely is. We have two major projects right now, one in Texas and one in Long Island, where the clients own commercial contracting companies that are building their homes out of concrete, steel beams, and all-metal framing. Having that commercial background, we’re no stranger to what we need to think about differently than your typical wood-frame, wood-joist construction. It’s a plus to not have to be concerned at all about the different mentalities and to be able to instruct my team of engineers on how to flip the switch on their thinking for these types of homes.

 

What impact did your background in live performance have on your interest in acoustics and how you approach your work?

Thanks to my grandfather, who was both a concert pianist and a violinist in some major orchestras both in Europe and the U.S., including the Cleveland Orchestra, I got a good start at age 7 playing piano. I took that as far as I could into a lot of different types of music such as musical theater and other types of groups and clubs. And then when I got to college, I was in 

bands and had a lot of fun. Even though I didn’t play out for many years as I was focusing on my career in the beginning, I always had the opportunity to go to a job site, whether it was a concert hall, school of music, or any other type of place where they had a piano, and just be able to play in some amazing spaces—when no one was around, of course. These days, I’ve really gotten back into performing live for people and doing live sound as well.

 

Having these talents and passions has been instrumental in advocating having spaces for live music in people’s homes, whether it’s for CEOs by day and closet guitarists by night jamming in a pretty awesome room or their kids learning to play their instruments and wanting the best-sounding environments. Or maybe bringing in Elton John or Lady Gaga for a million dollars to do their daughter’s bat mitzvah or wedding anniversary or something. It’s been so much joy and excitement to be part of creating these live music spaces throughout homes all around the world.

 

How did you cross paths with Theo Kalomirakis?

By accident. The first time I tried to cross paths was at a CEDIA book signing, but I stood in a long line and he ran out of books before I got to the front of the line, so I didn’t get to meet him. But I had been following all the great work he was doing and was fascinated by it, so I reached out, being local in the New York City area, and just made the call. And it was a fortuitous one because we’ve been working together very closely ever since.

 

I just had the right mentality coming into it from having worked with signature architects and designers on concert halls and theaters. I knew how to respect everything they were doing and how to get them to respect our side of the equation as well. You cannot tell someone like a Hugh Hardy how to design a Broadway theater aesthetically, because they would never bring you back. So I learned at a very early part of my career how to play that relationship very strongly. And it just worked with Theo. He was very open to that kind of approach, and it’s just been a great relationship all these years.

 

When I interviewed both of you about the Paradiso about a year ago, we talked about how the home theater had a live performance aspect as well. But you were brought in after everything was originally designed, right?

Yes. We changed a number of things to make it more optimized not just for cinematic use but for live music. We 

installed my Concertino system, which is basically electronic architecture to recreate sounds of different acoustic spaces. You press a button and it sounds like you’re in Carnegie Hall, but when you turn it off, you’re in a very dry, calm space.

 

But live music can happen in various ways, and that’s just one way to create a live space for jamming. For the big Texas project, we have about three or four different music performance and jamming areas—like a guitar jam room—right in the room, and it’s going to be awesome what they want to do with it.

 

Most home theaters aren’t very conducive to live performance. You can have people stand in there and play but it’s going to be far from optimal.

Most home theaters are on the drier side, acoustically—hopefully not too dead. Not too live, either, but you can have a good conversation in there. And so for certain types of music—amplified, for instance—it works OK. But you need a very different method of playback. You can’t use a home theater audio system, which would essentially be behind the performer, and if you had microphones, they would feed back tremendously. You need to think about what you need to augment the cinematic experience for live music.

 

And that goes beyond the sound to things like lighting. People don’t think about the fact that you have a screen producing a lot of light from the projector but you don’t have any light for a performer up there. We’re not lighting designers, but I know enough to be dangerous, as they say, so we know the basics of what you need to get good front and overhead lighting for even kids performing karaoke at the front of the room.

Steve’s residential work has included the acoustical engineering for many of Theo Kalomirakis’s theaters

It’s really about thinking through the aspects that make or break the multi-use function of these rooms. Again, I take that from my experiences with big multi-use theaters in the commercial world, about what we had to do to completely transform rooms from live acoustic symphonic music to Broadway-style shows in a few hours or a day, with the technical crew moving orchestral shells in and out, and so forth. You obviously scale that down for somebody’s private theater but it’s the same kind of thing. 

 

You want to make it simple, and the Paradiso was a great example of that. You could go to the iPad, press Concert mode—or Concertino mode, in our case—and so many things happened in the background to turn off the cinema system and turn on the live-music system and put the lights in the right positions and so on. You don’t want the client to worry about everything that’s happening in the background. You just want them to press that button and go from one mode to the other.

 

Given the diverse number of things you do, is there a typical project you’re brought in for on the domestic side or does it tend to be various different things?

Absolutely various things. Certainly theaters are always a lead-in because the AV integrators have those on the forefront of their minds to bring us into the projects, but it quickly expands beyond there. It’s everything from the theater to maybe a jam room to isolating a bedroom from street noise or outdoor equipment noise or a neighbor who has a barking dog or a band that the kids are playing in. It’s amazing, during COVID especially, the amount of awareness people have now of outdoor sound environments and how they impact their homes, especially when they’re working from home. 

 

Because what you do is somewhat specialized, do clients approach you directly or are you primarily brought in through another party like an integrator?

All of the above. We get our fair share from integrators but we have a lot of great architect and interior-designer relationships, mechanical engineer relationships, contractors, and then of course the clients. We’ve built a good network over as many years as I’ve been doing this, and so one client talks to the other, and that’s how it happens.

 

How much of your first meeting with a client is education? Does the groundwork tend to be laid by whoever brought you in or do you have to explain exactly what you do and what you can do for them?

It depends on the client—and I’m sure our integrator friends can relate to this. Some clients want to know every detail; others say, “Give me the best, and call me when it’s done, and I’ll write you the checks.”

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas

right: workmen apply fabric acoustic treatments to the
ceiling of the private
ballroom shown above.

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas

We love educating our clients—especially because so much of sound is subjective. Two people don’t think about sound in the home in the same way, including married couples. We’ve had husbands and wives get very heated with each other when talking about what does and doesn’t concern them when it comes to sound. 

 

We had one home in Park City, Utah where the architect was pretty much done with the design, and things were getting built and duct work was being fabricated, and we discovered that the mechanical systems—all 31 of them—were being built like jet engines because of special filtration needs. The house would have sounded like a factory. And the wife literally stood up and shouted, “We are so sensitive to noise, and my three kids are too!” and the husband was just shaking his head, like “Why didn’t I know?” We barely got in, put the project on hold, and quickly rectified all that so they could continue the process, and we managed to create a very quiet home. But just by the skin of our teeth because another month and it would have been way too late. It would have been an ugly situation because nobody paid attention to noise in a home where the wife and the three children were extremely sensitive, because nobody asked the question.

 

Who drops the ball in a situation like that? Who has to have that initial conversation and educate them about the need for this?

Yeah, well—who’s listening to this? In some respect, the clients need to do their own research. If they are sensitive to noise, they need to bring that to their architect and designers first and foremost. But even if they don’t, we often educate the architects in how to ask in how to ask the right questions. And sometimes we even prepare an assessment of the early design of a new home or renovation that brings out all the potential issues, from a containment and quality of sound perspective,

and then let the client decide what’s important to them and to what degree.

 

It’s important to have this up front so the whole team goes into it knowing, “Here are the things we’re going to address, and here are the things we just don’t care about,” so it doesn’t come back to bite anyone. The clients don’t want to move into a beautiful new home and all of a sudden they’re saying, “We’re hearing the kids running upstairs and every time they drop a toy or something, it sounds like a boulder.” Then we have to come in and say, “Would you rather rip up your beautiful wood floors or your ornate plaster ceiling—pick one.”

 

These are real problems homeowners have all the time

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas

where we get brought in after the fact—to the point where they literally are crying because they can’t sleep because of noise and vibration issues. Acoustic wellness is part of the other wellness movements because of its impact on people’s health and stress levels. And the pandemic brought this out in so many ways with kids schooling from home, and multiple partners, spouses, working from home. People are recognizing, “Wait, our home doesn’t always sound that great,” and we can do something about it.

 

I would assume most integrators’ knowledge of acoustics is related to entertainment spaces. Given the diversity of things you can address, do you consider yourself unique in the universe of people who deal with residential acoustics?

We’re certainly diverse. It’s not often you find someone from the design and consulting and calibration standpoint who will do bedrooms, do living rooms, mechanical noise, and so on. We like being able to come into projects in various ways. And I think that does make us fairly unique—not to mention all the commercial work we are still doing, flipping our brains several times a day to go back and forth between the high-end residential and the commercial.

 

How much of your work is commercial?

The percentages vary from month to month or year to year. Usually, we’re 50/50, but with the pandemic bringing out so many domestic opportunities, I would say we’re currently 60 to 65 percent residential. I’ve really trained my consultant team—I have such a great team now at all levels—to flip their mentalities, because you just cannot bring a commercial mentality wholeheartedly to the residential world without thinking about what’s practical. We’ve been brought on to high-end residential projects where they had a commercial consultant on board who got fired because they brought things to the home builders as solutions that just had no place even in the highest-end home because they were keeping myopically in the commercial mentality without saying, “Wait, how do we bring these two worlds together and determine what is still practical within the realm of what a high-end home builder could and would do.” That’s important.

 

And the same thing with the AV integrators. They’re resi-mercial, right? They always have to think about what’s appropriate as they go from one end to the other.

Working with the Best, Pt. 3: Steve Haas
It’s inevitable that anyone who does much traveling has come across your work at some point. They obviously haven’t been aware of it, but they’ve probably encountered it.

Hopefully they have, and hopefully they have some good things to say about it.

 

For instance, you did the Statue of Liberty museum, right?

That’s right. That finished about two or three years ago—with COVID, I’ve lost track of time. And we’re about to work on the Ellis Island re-do as well. 

 

Would either of those be the highest traffic-volume venue you’ve done?

Probably the biggest traffic one would be the Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture. That stayed packed for at least three years beyond its opening in 2016. We just could not believe how long it lasted. But it was phenomenal to see that, and phenomenal to think about how audio and acoustics hold up with that kind of visitation. You don’t have to worry about that in homes. 

Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

PODCAST EP. 21
QUICK GUIDE

 

  0:55  How his work extends well beyond

           providing the proper acoustics for home

           theaters

  1:21  His early experiences working on

           commercial spaces

  1:41  How a random phone call led to his initial

           involvement in home theaters & residential

           acoustics

  4:40  How his experiences working on major

           performance spaces helped him to expand

           his residential work beyond home theater 

  6:12  How homes are becoming more like

           commercial spaces

  7:21  The influence of his and his family’s

           experiences as musicians on his work 

  9:47  How he met and began working with Theo

           Kalomirakis

11:47  The Paradiso home theater as an example of

           a space that can handle both movies and

           live performance

13:30  What needs to be done with a home theater

           to make it conducive for live performance

16:49  How he’s typically approached to address a

           number of residential acoustic issues

           beyond home theaters

17:45  How the pandemic raised people’s

           awareness of the amount of noise in

           and around their domestic environments

18:24  How he is typically retained for a project

19:12  What the initial conversation is like with a

           client, and how much of it involves

           educating them about what he has to offer

21:48  The importance of the client researching

           the benefits of proper acoustics in the

           home

24:59  He offers a broader ranges of services

           than a typical AV integrator

26:21  How much of his work is commercial vs.

           residential

28:32  He has worked on so many landmark

           cultural institutions that most people have

           likely encountered his efforts at some point 

REVIEWS

Life in Color (2021)
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
The Mitchells vs. The Machines (2021)
Those Who Wish Me Dead (2021)
The Martian (2015)

ALSO ON CINELUXE

HBO Atones For Its Streaming Sins
The 75-Inch Revolution
Atmos Music: A World Beyond Movies
The Cineluxe Hour

Working With the Best, Pt. 2: Gideon Perry

Working with the Best, Pt. 2: Gideon Perry

Our second profile of the elite group of professionals who define luxury home entertainment features Gideon Perry, president of the L.A.-based Fantastic Theaters. Offering design, engineering, and construction services under one roof, his company is (to use his own words) “the closest thing there is to a turnkey cinema solution.”

 

In the conversation that follows, Gideon stresses the need for architects, designers, and clients to bring the trades involved in the actual construction of entertainment spaces into the planning process as early as possible so the complex needs of these rooms can be anticipated. He also discusses the dramatic changes in luxury entertainment over the past 20 years, from increased awareness of the importance of good acoustics to the emergence of video walls as a front-projection alternative to the desire for more flexible home theater spaces. 

—M.G.

(The text below is an abridged version of the podcast,
which you can hear using the player above.)

You provide a lot of different services but do have a typical approach to a job, or is it more about the being nimble enough to customize your process to each project?

I love car analogies. If you think of a Rolls Royce, every car is hand-built yet there’s an underlying core approach in place. We have a process we stick to pretty rigidly regardless of whether we’re doing something that’s small-scope or big-scope, small-budget or big-budget.

 

And it starts with our client questionnaire, because whether we’re doing the design or someone else is doing it and we’re just doing the build, it’s difficult to meet or exceed the client’s expectations if you don’t know what they are. Many people don’t realize what’s possible with a home cinema, so we have to gauge where the client’s at before we know what level we’re going to build to.

 

What are you typically approached for?

The one thing we don’t do is integration. We do have a handful of really good integration companies we work with, so if there is a desire for a project to be truly turnkey, we have those abilities. The design, engineering, and construction—we do all of that in-house. We have a unique facility with C&C machining capabilities, and a door factory, and a lot of different things that help us to achieve those goals. 

 

Our scope depends on who approaches us, whether it’s the client direct, a client rep, money manager, builder, designer, or whoever. Integration firms will often get the jobs and then reach out to us to help out. We work with a lot of design firms, so if

they come up with the theater design and the acoustic engineering and all that, we just build according to those plans.

 

But it’s about 50/50 as far as what our scope ends up being, whether we’re doing design, engineer, and build, or just build. We rarely do the design and someone else builds it. We also offer consulting services, so we have projects abroad in different states and countries where we will coach them along the process to make sure they’re doing it right. It’s kind of an insurance policy for the engineering you’ve paid for.

 

Is there an umbrella description for what you offer?

In the industry, we have to be the closest thing there is to a turnkey cinema solution. Many other companies do just design, and there are obviously a lot of integrators, acousticians, and engineers out there. But there isn’t one company that does it all in-house.

 

So, at your level, you would consider yourself unique?

Yeah, for sure. I don’t know of anyone else that is as inclusive as we are.

 

The fact that we do GC work gives us a unique perspective. A lot of people who design theaters have never built anything. Just like an architect, they draw this beautiful thing and apply all the local codes and all this stuff, but when the builder goes to build it, there are many changes that need to be made. For us, having worked for practically 

every theater designer in the industry, we have broad experience with what the principles are and what they’re going for, which allows us to know where we can take liberties to accommodate the field conditions.

 

Was construction your entry point to the industry?

Yes. I worked in a high-end custom cabinetry shop, and then I was an electrician, four-year journeyman, and then I got into GC work, building houses and doing remodels. And that’s when I discovered Theo Kalomirakis and home cinema at a very high level with dedicated rooms.

 

You worked on the Paradiso and were in there early on, right? 

Yeah. We were there from start to finish. What made the Paradiso unique was that there were so many different aspects. It wasn’t just a cinema—there was an arcade and a nightclub—all these different things. That was a first for us, to be that involved in the whole house—the acoustics in the arcade and creating all the soffit shapes in the bar. We were doing things that a typical builder would do.

 

How do you compare your approach to that of other people offering similar services at this level?

The biggest thing for us is the room itself, so that starts early on with architects and designers to make sure the footprint is correct, that the HVAC has not been overlooked, and we’re looking at very low noise-floors, which requires a lot of space to get the volume you want at a very low velocity. 

 

Treating the process as a whole instead of as individual bits and pieces is also unique. But that’s not anyone else’s fault. Just to take the AV guys, oftentimes they don’t come into a project until the shell is built, so there’s very little they can do to fix it or create a high-level room. At that point, it’s basically pick some gear, throw a little bit of acoustics on the wall, and call it a day.

Creating the structure (and concealing the speakers and other electronics) for
the legendary Paradiso theater (photo of completed theater by Randall Michelson) 

They may not have any authority at that point because there’s probably already an interior designer who’s taken over or the architect or whoever.

 

Our approach is different because we’re at the ground level, sitting down with architects before the plans are finished, going through the math and science of it in the very beginning. Nobody wants to talk about fluid dynamics and things like that, but when the room doesn’t function for its dedicated purpose, now you want to go back and talk about that. It’s kind of pennies on the dollar if you get in early enough to dig down dirt or whatever you need to to create the size, whereas once concrete’s poured it gets expensive to try to get the room to the correct size.

 

Has that changed over time? Do you now find yourself consistently getting in early enough or is there still a lot of regrouping that has to go on?

There’s still a lot of regrouping. When I first started, we probably got 90% of our projects from integrators, and now it’s probably 20%. We’ve done a good job of getting to architects and other designers early but we have a long way to go and we can’t do it alone. That’s why I want to bring awareness to the industry, so we can all work together. It benefits everybody. You end up with a far superior product. And it doesn’t have to be for that much bigger of a budget. It’s just planning and the sequence of events.

 

Now that high-end entertainment is spreading into more rooms and the demand to have entertainment-related infrastructure throughout the house is increasing, are you being called in earlier to talk about how entertainment relates to the entire home as opposed to that one dedicated room?

We are. The issue in the LA market is that there is a tremendous number of spec homes being built, and they’re just checking boxes of what the house needs to have—a cinema, a wine cellar, a sport court, or whatever—and then selling it. What’s happening is we’re then getting calls from the new owners to come back and make the house livable, because it’s all hard surfaces—glass and stone and tile—and everything is so reverberant and echoey, it’s just a nightmare.

 

And we’re seeing awareness of the quality of life in other rooms. Wellness is a big deal, and just by default we basically already build everything to wellness standards, as far as the noise level in the room, the air changes, using green materials, lighting—things like that.

 

People now look at even something like a big grand foyer in the house and all of a sudden they care about the acoustics, when it used to be you would walk in and it would just be this massive wall of marble or a staircase or whatever. Now we can

Installing acoustically transparent fabric
in the foyer of the Paradiso

incorporate acoustical plaster or different things that don’t change the aesthetic whatsoever but add tremendous value to the quality of life.

 

How aware are architects, developers, and clients of the level of experience that’s possible in an entertainment space?

There are very few who are that privy to what’s out there. If you look at cars, especially in LA, you’ll see Lamborghinis and Ferraris driving all over the place. So they buy what are basically race cars and they’re just going to get coffee or meet someone for lunch, right? Very few of those people have a racetrack in their backyard.

 

So that’s what we’re doing. You can have the theater to just impress your friends or you can really be a connoisseur and appreciate the immersive experience you can have. And we’ve seen it bring families closer together. We have a client that got married in their cinema. Especially now with videoconferencing, there are so many different ways the 

rooms can be used. People have band practice in there or whatever. So when you build it with the right foundation, the room can be used for so many different things.

 

There used to be a purist notion that home theaters could only be for movie watching, but the technology and construction have evolved to the point where they can now be multi-use spaces with few compromises. When you’re talking to a client, how do you educate them on what their options are?

It starts with the client questionnaire. Just by asking the right questions, you can find out what they know. Nobody wants to come across as uneducated, so you present it in a way to bring awareness of the options and the level that they can have. Most people think a commercial theater like an AMC or Dolby Cinema is the benchmark. They don’t realize we can blow that out of the water in their own home, no problem. 

 

But when you get into the private level of home cinema, you can really experience things the way the director intended. We have had directors sit in our rooms and say, “I didn’t even realize that was in the mix.” You can hear levels you can’t otherwise experience. So we want people to know that that’s possible. And it’s possible on a variety of different budgets and room sizes. You don’t have to put an IMAX in your house to have that experience. We can take a spare bedroom of your house and a make a three-seat cinema that just blows you away, and you’re completely immersed and lost for a few hours.

 

Are people skeptical when you tell them that?

More so at the beginning. One of the hardest things used to be convincing people to spend “X” amount of dollars behind drywall. The HVAC systems we design can be a couple hundred thousand dollars. Nobody wants to think about allocating that much budget to air. But if you want a good experience, it’s important not to feel fatigue, not to feel distracted—there are so many different elements that back up why we do what we do.

 

People are always skeptical, but we’ve found ways to relate it to them in real-world experiences and analogies. We can do virtual walk-throughs, so we can design the room and have them walk around and see it before we even think about building 

it. People convince themselves once they experience it.

 

Design-wise, what kinds of rooms do people tend to be looking for?

It’s geared less toward movie palaces and more toward the modern look at the moment—which is very difficult, because they want either just drapes or everything just hard surfaces, so finding that balance is tricky. A lot of people want rooms lighter now, which poses some imaging issues. You’ve got a big reflector in the front of the room, so if the 

Working with the Best, Pt. 2: Gideon Perry

room is too light and scenes change, it lights up the room. And that can really mess with the human psyche as to what you’re supposed to be seeing, triggering a fight-or-flight response that takes you out of the moment. You don’t have to have a black room, but those are some of the challenges we’re facing.

 

Is that a reaction to the man cave? They don’t want a room that looks like it’s a retreat but want something that’s more a part of the flow of the house instead.

I think so. As theaters have become a bigger focal point of the home and not just a man cave in the corner, they want it to be a little more beautiful, more for entertainment, an extension of the home. In the ‘90s and early 2000s, if you weren’t building a room that was extremely dark, you were messing up big-time. But now people realize it doesn’t have to be black. We still care about how bright the room is, but there are other things you can do. We can create sort of a chasm in the front that really lets you be immersed in the screen, and then we can kind of liven up the rest of the room. We can also have some fun with the rear wall and the ceiling and things like that. Things have progressed for sure.

 

People used to spend a fortune on a home theater but because only one family member knew how to operate it, the room often fell into disuse.

We have seen that scenario many times, and it’s usually because the interface is clumsy. We want our rooms to be the most used rooms in the house. We have clients that get their morning coffee and go sit in their cinema to watch the news. It’s not mainly about the cinema experience—it’s just the most comfortable room to be in and it obviously has a nice, large screen. But we can put all the work we want into it, if it’s not easy to use, it will not get used. As much money as you have, there’s nothing more embarrassing than not knowing how to turn something on. We can make sure the room performs well but if the client can’t turn it on, they’ll never know.

 

What else do you think people need to know about what you do and what needs to happen at this level in general?

Starting early is the biggest thing for sure, so what we actually end up building is specialized. The key thing is to get a good theater designer—and not just an interior designer. The aesthetics are important for sure, but if the room doesn’t perform to a high level, it’s a big wasted piece of real estate.

 

If I could just say one sentence to educate clients, architects, whoever, it would be to engage a theater designer. If we can design this from the beginning, you can basically have whatever you want. You’re doing it to get the shell, because while the electronics and technology are constantly evolving, and there’s always a new version of something, the math and science don’t change. You can change out the aesthetics or the AV equipment or whatever you want, but if you get the bones right, you’re going to be happy with that for the life of the house.

Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

PODCAST EP. 19
QUICK GUIDE

 

0:38    How his company approaches a project,

           regardless of its budget or size

2:34    A description of Fantastic Theaters’ services

4:19    “We have to be the closest thing there is to

           a turnkey cinema solution”

6:06    The impact of his construction background

           on his company’s approach to entertainment

           spaces

6:21    His experiences working on the Paradiso

           theater

8:20    The importance of focusing on the room’s

           construction

10:25  The need for proper planning and being

            brought into a project as early as possible

11:30   Being asked to make spec homes livable

            because entertainment needs weren’t taken

            into consideration

12:21   The increasing awareness of the need for

            proper acoustics throughout the home

13:40   Making clients aware of the level of

            performance achievable by a home cinema

16:50   Getting clients to realize the impact of

            things like HVAC on their movie-watching

            experience

18:14   The problem with relying too much on

            digital room correction

19:17   Tuning a room’s acoustics for various

            entertainment uses

21:00   The increasing use of video walls in

            home cinemas

23:03   The importance of finding a good theater

            designer

24:20   The current preference for modern spaces

             over movie palaces for home cinemas

26:47   How to avoid having a theater fall into

            disuse because it’s difficult to operate

REVIEWS

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989)
Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom
Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
The Mitchells vs. The Machines (2021)
Those Who Wish Me Dead (2021)
The Martian (2015)

ALSO ON CINELUXE

HBO Atones For Its Streaming Sins
The 75-Inch Revolution
Atmos Music: A World Beyond Movies
The Cineluxe Hour

Working with the Best, Pt. 1: Theo Kalomirakis

Working with the Best, Pt. 1: Theo Kalomirakis

Only a handful of people have the creativity, taste, knowledge, and experience to create a luxury home entertainment space. This new series of podcasts and features offers a unique look at the artisans who represent the pinnacle of each profession that goes into crafting these ultimate systems and rooms.

 

We focus on the collaboration with the homeowner, and what it’s like to retain and work with the best in the field. There’s no shop talk here, no inside baseball, no speeds and feeds. This is the closest you can come to engaging with one of these experts without sitting down with them in your home.

 

It would have been wrong to begin the series with anyone other than Theo Kalomirakis, who not only created the whole idea of home theater but showed its promise through his best-selling coffeetable books and continues to create the most innovative, opulent, and stunning private theaters in the world.

—M.G.

(The text below is a slightly abridged version of the podcast, which you can listen to using the player at the top of the page. Podcast listeners will find photos and graphics illustrating some of Theo’s examples by scrolling down the page.)

How do you typically approach designing a theater?

I usually get a project either directly from a client that read about us in a magazine or whatever or from an audio/video integrator. Getting it from the client is usually the most satisfying because either they’ve done their homework or they realize we are the ones that do it professionally. And they’re usually more amenable to do it the way I suggest we do it.

 

But even if the job comes from a custom installer, I like to have direct feedback from the client. You need to have that kind of access, otherwise you design in absentia. You don’t know what they want. You have to be able to interview them.

 

The first meeting with the client

The first meeting starts with sitting down with them and communicating my enthusiasm for the space, and with helping them to feel that I’m not selling them something. I’m just bringing them into my world, because I’m immersed in home theater architecture and I want them to be part of my excitement about it. I want to be able to communicate my ideas to them and make them relax so they can listen to me. I usually start the design process after I feel like I’ve connected with the client, after

he and I are on the same page.

 

Integrating the theater design into the rest of the house

Once our visions align, I start the work. Early in my career, the client would say, “Hey, I want an Art Deco theater because I’ve seen your theaters, and I like that style—it’s cinematic.” And I would usually say, “Yes, I love that style too. Let’s do an Art Deco theater.” But after I saw Deco theaters happening in very traditional environments, I started to feel embarrassed. It’s like when you go to Epcot Center and you go into the French pavilion or the Spanish pavilion—it had that kind of phoniness.

 

So I started putting my foot down, in a gentle way. I directed the client’s attention to the fact that the theater should echo the identity of the rest of the house—but without imitating it. You don’t want the theater to look like a living room or a dining room or whatever. You want it to look like a theater—but within the same language.

 

Earning the client’s trust

One of the key elements of bonding with the client is getting them to trust me so that if I have to steer them someplace other than what they think they want, they realize it’s not because I’m trying to play the prima donna but because I have their best interest in mind. I’ll tell them, “I don’t want to give you a theater where some of your guests will go ‘ooh’ and ‘aah’ but the more sophisticated guests will say, ‘What the hell is this theater doing in this house?’” I always seek approval—not only from the client but from the guests who might be more sophisticated than the client. I protect my ass from being accused of being a gimmicky guy.

 

Learning & assimilating the client’s taste

You have to know who the clients are as people. The first step is to learn what their tastes are. The next step is to make sure you guide them to things they may not have thought of. They may know what they like, and what they like may be perfectly legitimate, and you go with it. But if I sense that I can guide them to something they might

like just as much, I protect my integrity by also protecting the client from something that would be a liability.

 

The woman who wanted “gaudy”

I was doing a theater for a well-known baseball player, and I met with his wife somewhere in Georgia. The lady came in made up in a way that made Tammy Faye Bakker’s makeup look demure—huge eyelashes, painted lips, big bouffant hairdo. She was a caricature of a nouveau riche wife.

 

So I interviewed her to find out what exactly she liked, and it turned out she wanted something very, very ornate—all the kind of stuff ladies of the South associate with an expression that they’ve made it, they’ve arrived. “I want the theater with a lot of gold,” she said. “A lot of gold.” I took a step back because I was surprised and said, “You mean you want an opulent theater.” She said, “No, honey. I want it gaudy!”

 

Good for her. She knew what she was looking for. You can’t fight that kind of person. You can’t persuade someone with a gaudy house to do something more understated. You listen to them, and 90% of the time they make sense.

 

The client who wanted the Acropolis

There were two or three times when I really hit a wall and didn’t know what to do, like at another house in Jupiter Island. It was fairly traditional—not particularly gaudy—with a typical Floridian richness.

 

When I saw the space for the theater, I asked the wife, “Do you have a particular style you want?” “Yes!” she said. “We want the Acropolis!” I almost swallowed my tongue. I said, “What do you mean?”  She said, “You know—like the Versillis.” She didn’t even know how to say “Versailles.” Now, what the Acropolis had to do with Versailles, your guess is as good as mine. I decided there was no way I could do anything there, that I would be responsible by association.

 

How do you translate the client’s idea into a theater?

I usually crank up the volume. They come with some kind of concept that’s in the right direction but it’s not full-fledged. My role is to start from their concept and improve it, enhance it, and make it more exciting.

 

The importance of a proper theater environment

If I react negatively to a client, it’s usually because they say they want a comfortable seating layout. “We don’t want anything structured—we want a sofa here and an armchair there, an ottoman there.” I try to be very restrained in my response because it’s their choice—that’s how they watch movies. I make an effort to educate them that if they do that, they’re getting a living room in the guise of a theater. You have all the accoutrements of a theater but it’s literally a living room.

Theo originally designed the space above to accommodate traditional theater seating but
modified the design to honor the client’s preference for living-room-like seating arrangements

The classic example of that was the house in Vegas [shown above], where I couldn’t persuade them to do something that was more theatrical. That was a very well-defined theater that focused on the screen, the stage, and everything, but the wife put sofas in it like in a living room.

 

This is a typical contradiction I have with the client. They want a theater but they also want comfortable seating. I’ll tell them, “By doing that, you have one foot in your living room and the other foot in my theater language.” I can’t reconcile the two.

 

My clients usually have a living room and a media room, so I try to tell them, “We can do that in the media room, where it makes sense. But let the theater be a theater, with comfy seats spread apart with big arm rests, and you can kick up your legs because of the recliner. You still have the comfort of a living room.” 

 

When I go down to my theater and I recline, it’s ideal. You see the movie. You have good sight lines. You don’t lose that luxury of a theater, where you’re meant to be able to watch a movie with people in front of you and behind you. You shouldn’t be facing each other in a position that’s meant for chit-chatting, not for watching a movie. 

 

Casual seating is meant to accommodate unruly owners who want to talk to each other while the movie’s playing. When someone comes into my theater and starts talking, I stop them, as polite as I can. “Don’t talk. Let’s watch a movie.” So when my clients want something casual, I try to persuade them to do theater seating. Do I always win? 90% of the time.

 

Have you seen a big shift from movie palaces to more contemporary designs?

There are people who want to have the movie experience without reference to the grandeur of the old movie palaces. Figuring out how to create that same kind of excitement in a room that is expressed using contemporary architecture has 

Working with the Best, Pt. 1: Theo Kalomirakis

been my Holy Grail. It’s very difficult because our minds are filled with images of ornate palaces with chandeliers and everything, which creates the ambience of wanting to see a movie. Creating that ambience using a more contemporary language is very difficult because it’s, by its nature, more stripped down.

 

But I’ve found out that you can achieve that mostly through lighting, which creates that excitement. 

Just add lighting to a room—not sconces on the wall but strip lighting or columns with backlighting—and it brings the architecture to the level of a theater.

 

Who assembles & supervises the team to create one of your theaters?

For the big projects, I usually bring the people, like acoustic designers and lighting designers—not interior designers because I usually do that myself. It’s like making a movie—you get specialists to do the various tasks. You get a crew that works together synergistically to divide the elements of the theater into their various expertises.

 

For lighting, I usually work with Howard Werner, who is a lighting designer on Broadway. He did Spider-man with Julie Taymor. For acoustics, I’ve worked very extensively with Steve Haas because he knows my ways. And he’s compromising in the same way that I’m compromising, to accommodate the acoustics. When you work with experts like that, you have to respect each other’s trades.

 

How do you accommodate the client’s or integrator’s equipment requirements?

If the job comes from an audio/video integrator, I ask immediately to get the list of equipment and the placement of the speakers. I design around what they want and where they’re going to  position the speakers on the wall. I totally respect the science of someone who has to put the speaker in exactly the right location to the left or the right of the subwoofer. So I’m very accommodating.

 

What happens when the equipment gets in the way of the design?

Sometimes you have to go back to the integrator and say, “That wasn’t what I proposed”—like a recent project in Texas. The manufacturer put the subwoofers all the way to the floor but I specified a 6-inch baseboard there. I said, “Come on, guys. Lift the woofer off the floor 6 inches. Will that create havoc? Is it going to ruin the room acoustics? I gave you a room that’s 90% transparent to put the speakers wherever you want.” The whole room is stretched fabric, so they could put the speakers pretty much anywhere, but I wanted a baseboard so people wouldn’t kick the fabric, or especially the subwoofer, when they went down down the steps.

 

Does the screen choice sometimes compromise your design?

It’s usually easy to get a client to go with the right screen. If it’s a low-ceiling room, I tell them to avoid using a 16:9 screen because it will need to go all the way to floor, so you won’t be able to see the bottom of the image from some of the seats. I tell them to use a wide screen because it will fill the room width-wise but it doesn’t need to go all the way down.

 

If they get a wide screen, they can watch epic movies like Lawrence of Arabia without bars at the top and bottom, and they’ll be able to move the image inside the screen if they want to watch 16:9 content. If they say, “We don’t watch movies—we watch sports,” then they’re meant for a 16:9 screen. But if I have my way, I push for the wide screen because you get a bigger screen in a smaller space.

 

Have you seen video walls being used more frequently in home theaters?

Not yet because they’re very expensive, around $300,000 to $400,000. But a nicely calibrated set will give you the same performance as a projector—and probably an advantage, because you’re going to produce a brighter picture. When I watch 

3D movies in my theater, they suffer. Even though I have a bright projector, the level goes down. You don’t have that problem with a display.

 

You like to create a sense of anticipation before people enter one of your theaters. Have clients ever objected to that?

Nobody has rejected that because I usually remind them of what it’s like to go to a movie theater. When you go there, you don’t expect to open the door from the sidewalk and find yourself in the middle of the theater. Why? Because going to a movie is like riding a submarine. As you go up in the water, you have to go through various compartments of decompression before you get to the very top.

 

So you need to go from a small space to a larger space to an even larger space—and I usually bring up the example of the Roxy Theater in New York. The Roxy had an incredible corridor with movie posters right on 50th St. and 7th Ave. that was like 10 

Working with the Best, Pt. 1: Theo Kalomirakis

Theo’s design for the Ritz Theater in Texas takes visitors down a long hallway and through a series of lobbies before they arrive at the theater proper, which is placed right next to where they first entered

feet high. From that you would get to the ticket lobby, which was grander—like 15 feet high. Once you were past that, you went down into a tunnel that was 8 feet or 9 feet high that led to the grand rotunda, which zoomed up to 70 feet.

 

It’s like an orchestral piece. You orchestrate the crescendos and the pianissimos to create variation and a sense of anticipation and a sense of excitement for when something big happens. You can’t have a symphony that starts with a big crescendo and just stays there.

 

I explain to the client that, even if they have the smallest space in the world, they should let me subdivide it. I’m not taking away from the space—I’m giving them a more nuanced approach to the theater. I haven’t met anybody who’s said “No,” unless they just don’t have the space.

 

I did a theater called The Ritz in Texas [shown above]. It’s in my book Great Escapes [page 136]. The client gave me the attic, which was a big space—2,000 square feet—and he said, “How many seats can we fit in here? I have a big space and a big 

Working with the Best, Pt. 1: Theo Kalomiraks

Max Fleischer’s 1934 cartoon tour of the ultimate movie palace

family.”  I said, “Wrong question. It’s not how many seats. It’s how do you create a home theater environment?”

 

So I created a layout that was like a maze that was opening up. The theater ended up right next to the left of the entry, but you had to go all the way to the back and snake around and go through inner lobbies—a big lobby and a grand foyer—and then a smoking room, and then two corridors. And finally, breathlessly, you arrived at the theater.

It’s just like what Disney does with the theme rides where they have you waiting in line for two hours and you watch different things on TV or you go from one room to another before you get onto the ride. They prepare you. That is not done to showcase the architecture of the various rooms; it’s to create a sense of anticipation, which is what I do by capturing the grandeur of arriving at the Roxy in a simple theater—which is what that Max Fleischer cartoon accomplishes so well.

 

Working with the client’s interior designer

I usually don’t talk to the client while I’m working with the architect and contractor. But when the construction is underway, I meet with them to select things. That’s a very important part of the job because usually there’s a designer in attendance, and they don’t want the theater to be too far away from what they’re doing in the rest of the house. I tell them not to use bright colors in the theater, and that they can’t use a carpet design that jumps out of the floor because it makes the seats prominent.

 

Scaling the seating to the rest of the theater

The seats are probably the most damaging element in a theater because they’re large. Everything else I do is kind of miniaturized to create a sense of scale, so the wrong seats can throw my work out of proportion. The most typical example 

of that is the theater I did that was a recreation of Ocean Drive in Miami Beach. But when you see the seats, which are as big as the buildings, you say right away, “That’s fake.” Your sense of disbelief is eliminated and you suddenly see the artifact, that it’s all miniatures to create an effect.

 

I was watching the Netflix documentary Martin Scorsese did with Fran Leibowitz, and there’s a scene where she sits in

Working with the Best, Pt. 1: Theo Kalomirakis

the miniature of Manhattan that’s in Queens. And then she steps into the set, and her shoes are as high as some of the shorter buildings. She becomes like Gulliver among the Lilliputians.

 

How does your approach differ from other theater designers?

I don’t really know because I haven’t really worked with them. All I know—and this is a very generic observation—is theater designers with a technical background tend to start from the technology. And that is Sam Cavitt, and that’s Keith Yates. They’re very protective of technology, and they should be. Traditional designers are the opposite. They start with the interior design, and they tend to be technology adverse. I see myself as sitting in the middle, between acoustical or technical designers and those who decorate. If I were to put a label on my principal contribution to home theater design, it’s that I became a bridge between technology and design by respecting both.

 

How did you learn to balance technology & design?

When technical or acoustic designers like Steve Haas began to get involved, I had to start listening to them. I didn’t want to because I wanted to decorate, but slowly I realized it’s not just decoration. They would pressure me—“We can’t put that speaker too far behind the seats. We want it here.” So you have to work with the integrator, or with clients who are sound-savvy.

 

And I learned to pay attention to materials. You can’t make a theater using all wood. It looks fantastic, but wood is very reflective. So I learned to use materials that aren’t reflective—not only in terms of material but of color. If you have a white surface, it reflects too much color off the screen and makes you aware you’re in the room. You want the room to disappear.

 

The extreme case of wanting the room to disappear is [video-calibration expert] Joe Kane. He doesn’t want to have anything other than a black room, which is going to the one extreme. Having a room that’s very bright and colorful would be the other. There’s got to be a middle ground, where the room can look attractive when the lights are on but disappears when you watch a movie, like in my theater downstairs.

 

I can change the color of the walls to give the room a different personality because I have LEDs, but when the movie begins, the room disappears. So, everything can be done if you know the tricks of the trade, and I developed them by making mistakes and figuring out what works and what doesn’t.

Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

PODCAST EP. 17
QUICK GUIDE

 

0:32   How do you typically approach designing a

          theater?

1:55   The first meeting with the client

3:00   Integrating the theater design into the rest of

          the house

4:42   Earning the client’s trust

6:00   Learning & assimilating the client’s taste

6:57   The woman who wanted “gaudy”

8:39   The client who wanted the Acropolis

10:20  How do you translate the client’s idea into

           a theater?

10:58  The importance of a proper theater

           environment

15:12  Have you seen a shift from movie palaces to

           more contemporary designs?

16:53  Who assembles & supervises the team to

           create one of your theaters?

19:33  How do you accommodate the client’s or

           integrator’s equipment requirements?

20:51  What happens when the equipment gets

           in the way of the design?

21:20  Does the screen choice sometimes

           compromise your design?

23:23  Have you seen video walls being used more

           frequently in home theaters?

24:42  You like to create a sense of anticipation

           before people enter one of your theaters.

           Have clients ever objected to that?

30:14  Working with the client’s interior designer

30:51  Scaling the seating to the rest of the theater

33:04  How does your approach differ from other

           theater designers?

34:51  How did you learn to balance technology &

           design?

REVIEWS

Nashville (1975)
Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)
Nomadland (2020)
Gattaca (1997)
The Ten Commandments (1956)
The Long Goodbye (1973)

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The Cineluxe Hour

Ep. 15: Theo at Home

The Cineluxe Hour logo

Legendary home theater designer (and Cineluxe contributor) Theo Kalomirakis went back to Greece last year to supervise work on his summer home only to find himself locked down in the country, thanks to the pandemic. He quickly realized his confinement was a blessing in disguise since it allowed him to enjoy the cuisine, walking on the nearby beach, his work-in-progress home—and the attention of the Athenians, who have embraced him as a long-lost son.

 

Theo decided to have his personal home theater transported from the U.S. and reconstructed in the basement of his new home, where he implemented a number of upgrades (which we discuss in the episode).

He was also able to realize a childhood dream. Greece is famous for its outdoor theaters, and, wanting to emulate those, Theo as a teenager built his first home theater out on the terrace of his parents’ apartment in Athens. Never able to find a way to do something similar at his Brooklyn home, he seized on the chance to take advantage of the 10,000 square feet of property surrounding his summer home to create the ultimate outdoor movie space.

Our conversation covers the circumstances that brought Theo to Greece and the creation of his new personal theaters along with a slew of other subjects, including his latest work and his love for movies. Here’s a road map:

 

0:00    How the pandemic brought him back to Greece.

5:06    How he planned his new home theater.

5:49    How his new yard became an outdoor theater.

7:14    The status of his archives, which document the history of home theater.

8:18    How he’s been embraced by the Greek film community.

8:26    Donating his collection of 5,000 laserdiscs.

10:13  Donating his collection of 6,000 Blu-ray Discs.

11:40  The Greek passion for movies.

13:30  The effort to finish his home theater.

13:53  The improvements over his Brooklyn theater.

16:06  Theo’s preference for a clean, modern design style vs. the “movie palace” approach.

19:16  How his outdoor theater was inspired by Greek theaters & his first home theater.

22:45  A description of the outdoor theater.

25:17  His efforts to archive his collection of Blu-ray Discs and 9,000 DVDs.

27:35  The impressive recent re-issues of Technicolor movies.

30:49  What 4K brings to re-issues.

31:42  Technicolor vs. contemporary films (The Harvey Girls vs. Tenet).

33:10  Wrap-up / tweaking his home theater.

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Michael GaughnThe Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review, Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs, a couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

Cineluxe Trendsetters: Theo Kalomirakis

So much has been written about Theo Kalomirakis and his body of work—the subject of two bestselling coffeetable books and countless articles and videos—that there’s not much left to say. Except maybe that, for all of that attention, people still don’t have a good bead on exactly how innovative and influential his efforts have been, or that his theaters spring primarily not from an interest in gear or interior design but from a deep love for movies and the art of watching them.

Theo’s work is a sincere and natural extension of that love, which goes well beyond just being a fan to being someone who understands and appreciates the deep wellsprings that feed the art of the movies. And because of that almost naive sincerity, Theo in casual conversation is the same Theo you get in an interview on camera. He would make a lousy corporate spokesman because he always says exactly what he thinks and feels—which is why he has always been the best possible representative for the industry he gave birth to and continues to inspire, and for everything that’s great about watching movies at home.

 

We had a chance to do a a brief interview with Theo in his temporary apartment overlooking the Hudson River right before he departed for his new home in Greece—a move that included dismantling and shipping the entire private cinema in his New York City apartment to be reconstructed in his summer residence. We discussed the pandemic’s impact on moviewatching, how he was faring with an ad hoc system in his temporary digs, and whether 8K will represent the same significant stride forward as did the progression from VHS to DVD to Blu-ray to UHD.

Here’s hoping Theo will be back in the States sometime soon so we can record a more exhaustive, definitive exchange on his history, theaters, and legacy.

CINELUXE TRENDSETTERS

Inside the Ultimate Home Entertainment Space

photos by Randall Michelson

Legendary designer Theo Kalomirakis and acoustician Steve Haas have collaborated on a number of cost-no-object home theaters, but probably none of those efforts has been as ambitious, versatile, or well-realized as the Paradiso. Seventeen years in the making, this Southern California gem is actually an entire home-entertainment complex built around an Italianate piazza. The reference-quality 15-seat home theater doubles as a fully-fledged concert hall. The nightclub features a hydraulic stage and can handle anything from a rock band to a jazz group. Next door to the club resides an arcade, containing the homeowner’s extensive collection of pinball machines and video games. There’s even a g-force flight simulator.

 

At a time when people are developing a new appreciation for what home entertainment has to offer, the Paradiso provides the ultimate example of what can be done when you venture outside the home theater box. I recently talked to Steve and Theo about the project’s genesis, execution, and legacy.

—Michael Gaughn

THEO KALOMIRAKIS: The client had been dreaming about doing a theater with me and asked me to do the basement of his house, which is next to where the Paradiso is now. It had a seven-and-a-half-foot ceiling, so it was only a modest room. I did it because I liked the guy very much. He was passionate about doing something, but there was not much I could do with the space. So he sensed I was kind of compromising.

 

One day, he called me and said, “Theo, I have good news and bad news for you.” I said, “What is the bad news?” He said, “I have to pull the plug on the theater downstairs because I cannot see myself working with you in such a compromised space.” 

“So, what’s the good news?” “I bought two lots next to my house, and I want to set you free to design whatever the hell you want. Let your mind soar. I trust you.” It was the best thing I was ever offered to do.

 

Since the house is located in an Italianate enclave, he said, “We need to do something that would be very much in keeping with 

the neighborhood.” Which is fine, but I realized the size I had in mind for the theater exceeded the one-story height that would be allowed there. That started our endless process of digging down to create a subterranean environment.

 

Originally, there were going to be two more floors below the piazza level, and he kept pushing. “Let’s dig some more. Let’s put the bowling alley there. Let’s have a restaurant for 30 people.” I said to him, “If we dig anymore, we’re going to reach China before we do the theater. So let’s put a stop on it.”

 

And then 2008 came. When the bubble burst, he called me and said, “There is no budget to excavate, so we have to scrap the basement. Can we limit the scope to make it into just the piazza level?” And of course, we redesigned the whole thing.

Inside the Ultimate Luxury Home Entertainment Space

click on the image to enlarge

The idea of adding multiple environments is an extension of what I have described in my book, Great Escapes, as my need to break away from the constraints of a very limited room where you only watch TV. I was dreaming of spaces where before you go into the theater, you have to go under marquees and through lobbies and other areas. And now, here I had the room to do it.

 

We ended up creating a city environment based on his desire to bring in Italian architectural influences. He sent me to Italy and I spent 10 days in Siena. I took about 2,000 photographs in nearby villages for reference. I came back and showed him some incredible charcuterie stores that sold cheeses, and pizzerias, and this and that, and he said, “Let’s do it.” The only things that were dictated by him were the arcade, because he had a very nice collection of pinball machines and video games, and the nightclub because he wanted to have gigs for jazz.

 

He basically gave me permission to go crazy. He didn’t ask me to do this village or do this or do that. I presented the ideas that he gradually grasped and accepted. It’s usually a collaborative effort. The client lets his imagination go to think about the things that mean something to him, and I put them into context.

 

Steve, you were obviously heavily involved in the theater space, but I would imagine you worked on the nightclub as well.

STEVE HAAS: We were involved in all the spaces, really, because acoustics and audio mattered in the pizzeria, the arcade, and even the lobby. For all of these, we provided general noise control, sound containment, and acoustic treatment, as well as audio system design and calibration. But the premier spaces were the cinema, the nightclub, and the pizzeria. This wonderful client was just so open in sharing his goals and desires. In addition to his love for arcade games, he also loved live music. His daughters were both learning to play string instruments, so he wanted the ability to have everything from a more formal concert environment to a loose hangout-type of club where you can have rock bands or jazz groups come and play. He can have a chamber trio performing in the theater and a rock band in the club with no sound bleed between them.

 

Somebody coming into the theater cold would think it’s just for watching movies, but it’s actually a fully-fledged performance space as well.

TK: I want to remind you, Mike, that the theaters that have inspired me over the years were never just for watching movies. The movie palaces were mixed-use spaces where you could have an orchestra and also acrobats or a comedy act or whatever, which is exactly what the Paradiso can do. So it’s not like we suddenly came up with the novel idea of using a

theater this way. This project brought us back, completed the circle to what the movie theaters were supposed to be.

 

Does the desire to be able to do live performances in a home theater come up very often with clients?

TK: Yes, but usually at a much more elementary level.

 

SH: It doesn’t happen nearly as often as it should. And, yes, that’s a biased perspective, but I think a lot of people just don’t realize what can be done. 

Inside the Ultimate Home Entertainment Space

And even if you don’t go to the nth degree like we did with the Paradiso, there are many ways to upgrade a theater space, and it starts with the layout. You have to have the space to be able to have one to four people be able to play and perform, and have a system that can support it—not just audio, but lighting, because that’s different from what you need for a home theater system.

 

TK: Because live performances require specific lighting, we brought in a very well-known lighting designer with a background in theater. This is probably the only project I’ve done in the US that incorporated so many different disciplines. It’s not just the clients who don’t realize all the possibilities. Even the designers cannot wrap their heads around how many wonderful things you can do in a space like that.

 

Steve, the theater had to have a traditional surround sound system for watching movies, but you also have your Concertino system in there for live performances. Are they two discrete systems or is there some overlap?

SH: I think we did share a couple of components. Maybe some of the subwoofers were relay switched back and forth, but inherently quite independent.

 

There was a lot of control programming. If you could see all the bells and whistles switching behind the scenes, it would be amazing. Almost a dozen processes switched in a sequenced manner to go just from theater mode to live concert and back, 

but the user interface was as simple as pressing a button for the initial selection and then there were custom presets within each mode.

 

What did the Concertino system bring to this project in particular, given what the client wanted to do?

SH: The Concertino, which is in the nightclub and pizzeria as well, expanded the ability to have various kinds of live music in an acoustically dry room. As Theo knows, we don’t design “dead” home theaters. However, even a mildly dry diffused home theater appropriate for cinema presentation doesn’t provide the right acoustic for many types of live music.

 

This acoustic-enhancement technology allows the performance space to become a true-sounding

concert hall, cathedral, or any other space you can imagine. So if they want to have a choir, string orchestra, or even a jazz group with a bit livelier sound, you can do that and then blend it with more traditional amplified sound as needed.

 

I’ve heard that people have been in that space and didn’t even know there was processing going on because it sounded so authentic, or is that an exaggeration?

SH: That’s exactly right. This is a world of difference from the Concert Hall and Cathedral modes you get in your car stereo or home receivers. This is recreating in the digital virtual electronic world exactly what a real hall of a different size, different shape, a different acoustic will do to enhance sound—the early reflections, reverberations in the proper timing and frequency manner. The technology can be described for days, but in the end it’s all about what happens when somebody presses a button and sits down and that string quartet, that cellist comes out, and just like, “Wow.” It’s just a great experience for performers and audience alike.

 

Theo, you weren’t here when Mike and I discussed how things are changing with music performances over livestream during the pandemic, but having spaces like this, whether it’s to this degree or even one or two degrees lower—I think a lot of affluent homowners are going to say, “You know what, I don’t want to be in a theater with 1,000 or 2,000 other people for quite some time. So why not create great-sounding spaces that will allow me to bring that type of experience home, literally, for not just movies, but for live music and other types of live entertainment?”

 

TK: I am hearing from people, “I don’t want to go to the movie theaters and catch a disease. I want to make my house be more like a theater.” This is an incredible new opportunity. And it’s up to us to capture it and relay the message that you can have this kind of theater space in your home.

 

SH: Am I hearing Theo saying he’s getting back into custom theaters again?

 

TK: I do want to do custom theaters but very, very selectively. If there is something of the caliber of the Paradiso, I will do it.

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury
theater designs to his credit. He is an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,ooo discs.
Theo is the Executive Director of Rayva.

Steve Haas is the Principal Consultant of SH Acoustics, with offices in the NYC & LA
areas. He has been a leading acoustic and audio design & calibration expert for more
than 25 years in high-end spaces ranging from home theaters, studios, and live music
rooms to major museums and performance venues.

Michael Gaughn—The Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review,
Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs,
couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

Creating Rayva: Vin Bruno

Creating Rayva: Vin Bruno
Theo's Corner

Rayva CEO Vin Bruno has been key in taking my desire to stem the decline in home theater and
help turn it into a viable company offering turnkey entertainment-room solutions. I recently talked
with Vin and Cineluxe editor-in-chief Michael Gaughn about the factors that led to Vin joining the
company and about what we’ve been able to accomplish since he came on board.

—T.K.

 

 

Michael Gaughn  My understanding, Vin, is that Theo recruited you to be Rayva’s CEO. How did that come about?

 

Vin Bruno  When I was the CEO of CEDIA, I was two weeks into the job, giving a presentation at our awards banquet, and amongst the 300 attendees, I spotted Theo. After the banquet was over, I went to find him and say hello, and he expressed his concern about the decline of home theater. The very next week, I went to Theo’s apartment in Brooklyn to see what we could do, as CEDIA and as an industry, to reverse that decline. And that was when Theo presented his vision for Rayva to me. And I thought, wow, this is the right thing to do. This is a great initiative. It will drive lots and lots of business and profitability to CEDIA’s members if they help implement Theo’s vision.

MG  Theo, how well did you know Vin before you approached him about Rayva?

 

Theo Kalomirakis  Vin and I have been friends forever, and he had me work with him to develop the theater experience for Crestron. To me, Vin represented a very, very fresh perspective in how you reach out with an idea. When we met after that CEDIA event he described, he impressed me with a story he told. He was in Dallas, and he found out that there are about 800 integrators in that city, and only about 10 of them were CEDIA members. So Vin recognized the opportunity for reaching out to these people to educate them and make them our partners in selling home theaters. I love that approach because it thinks outside the box and sees the potential that exists beyond what is easily within our reach.

 

I wanted everybody in Rayva to have that kind of vision. Vin is so important to the company because he has the trust of everybody. And they may not buy into my vision because I’m very passionate and sometimes I don’t communicate properly or people are threatened by me. But Vin does it methodically from a business perspective without losing his vision that the world out there is much bigger than what we can get by working hand-in-hand with just the integrators at CEDIA. That’s a finite effort that’s not going to get us far.

 

Vin is my partner and ally in this venture because he embraces the same values and the same bigger vision that will eventually allow us to reach out to the people who are specifying theaters—designers and architects—and eventually to the end user. That’s our biggest goal, to reach the end user directly and teach them what the benefit of a home theater is and how it can enrich their lives.

Creating Rayva: Vin Bruno

ABOUT VIN BRUNO

A veteran of the custom integration industry, Vin Bruno joined Rayva’s board of directors in 2017. He is now the company’s CEO, leading promotions and marketing initiatives meant to educate architects, builders, and technology integrators about Rayva’s turnkey home theater solutions.

 

Vin has had a number of leadership positions in the AV industry throughout his career. He helped Crestron double its sales revenue during his tenure as Director of Marketing, and his marketing efforts helped rejuvenate CEDIA during his time there as CEO.

 

He has also served on the advisory council for the Harvard Business Review and on the Consumer Electronics Association’s TechHome Division board.

MG  Theo, tell me if I’m wrong, but it seems like Rayva really hit its stride within the past year, right around the time Vin came on board.

 

TK  Yes, that’s true.

 

MG  I know the company went through a lot of struggles early on, and there was a lot you needed to figure out. What did both of you need to do to get on the same page? How much did rethinking the whole engineering process and the effort to productize theaters have to do with that?

 

TK  Realizing the need to rethink the engineering happened organically about a year ago when we realized that the way I had defined the product was not repeatable and was not productized enough to create a consistent offering that could be deployed successfully every time a client wanted a theater. Essentially, I woke up one day and said, “We missed it.” That was a rude awakening when I saw things being installed, and they were not consistent with my vision. I saw face-to-face what other people couldn’t see, that this product needed severe attention to detail that it didn’t have.

I was trained as a custom designer. My eyes aren’t trained to go beyond the surface and see what it takes to make that surface stand and work. So that was the evolutionary change that began a year ago when the first theaters were being installed. That realization put us in overdrive to develop an efficient way to deploy the theaters that would guarantee our success and our repeatability as we reached out to designers and architects, and expanded to other countries.

 

VB  As for the first theaters we deployed, I think you’re absolutely right. We took a product and we delivered it as if it were a custom job. And we then stepped back and said, “Well, this isn’t scalable and it’s a lot of work.” We wanted to minimize the effort for our technology integrators in installing a Rayva theater. So the work Theo and the engineering team he put together has created is patentable—and we are going to pursue patents on these products and these methods. He’s made delivering a Rayva theater as consistent as buying pencils at Staples. It’s that simple to take delivery of a theater and take the elements out of the box and install them on the wall.

 

MG  Now that you’ve worked out the product, what do you think it’s going to take to create a renewed demand for dedicated home theater rooms?

 

VB  We need to inform both integrators and potential customers. People don’t know what they don’t know. There are technology integrators that don’t know they can be in the business of deploying home theaters. Homeowners don’t know they can have a home theater in their house. Most people think that it’s over the top, expensive, complicated, and lots of changes need to happen. They don’t realize we can take any spare room they have and turn it into their relaxation space where they can sit and listen to music or watch movies or have their kids or grandkids play video games, and keep those lovely sounds of the video games in that room. So that will be the service 

we can provide—to let people know that this business, and the profitability of this business, is within their grasp. It’s accessible to all technology integrators and it’s accessible to homeowners who think a theater is out of reach.

 

MG  It seems like any resurgence in home theaters would have to be spurred not so much by a love of movie theaters or watching movies on discs, but by the popularity of online movie services.

 

TK  I agree, and I’ll use myself as an example. I used to use my own home theater much more rarely than I do now because it required an effort to go and find a disc and put it in. I found that cumbersome. Only making the time to watch the latest release on disc made it a unique, singular, one-off experience. But streaming has revolutionized the way I watch movies, and I’m pretty sure it’s the same for other people. I watch movies every day because no more discs. I turn on the TV, and I look at 

Creating Rayva: Vin Bruno

my Kaleidescape screen, my Netflix screen, my Amazon screen. The fact that there’s such an abundance of content—such an abundance of good content—has made the use of my theater not so archaic and so kind of specific. Online content has really opened up the flexibility of a dedicated room to a degree that wasn’t available before.

 

VB  We can see that same phenomenon as a company, which is why we as an industry are so important to the ISPs. We’re providing a way for people to enjoy streaming content in the best way possible. Instead of viewing it on tablets or phones, we actually now deliver it to big screens.

 

Ultimately, home theaters are in the best interest of technology integrators and their businesses, and home theaters are in the best interest of families and their homes. Enjoying entertainment in a dedicated room is an enjoyable and valuable way to spend time together. And, to bring our conversation full circle, that’s what inspired me to join Theo in his efforts at Rayva.

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is also an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo
is the Executive Director of Rayva.